Some Insights from Autcom

I won’t write about all of the insights at Autcom that impacted me, but I will say that one part in particular Melanie Yergeau‘s presentation was creepy. Don’t misunderstand – Melanie gave a great presentation that was really insightful and interesting. She illustrated one of her points about how some uninformed outsiders “hack” autism by playing this video:

Of course any video that starts, “Autism Speaks wanted people to experience how this must truly feel for parents…”  Of course I could comment on the choice of an Asian child that looks unhappy as the example of autism by a group of almost-exclusively white upper middle class people viewing it – there are definite shades of racism and cultural bias. But even ignoring that, again, our parents are what is important. And apparently the problem isn’t that the girl seems unhappy, it’s that she doesn’t make eye contact. To make the parent feel good.

I didn’t actually think anything could lower my opinion of Autism Speaks as an organization. That was insight one: they are capable of new (to me) and surprising things.

You can look forward to me someday creating an autism simulation using a creepy white kid to stare you down no matter how you try to move out his creepy gaze.

Another insight was more personal, from Suzanne Oliver’s presentation. She’s a music therapist in the US who talked about the importance of rhythm in creating, stopping, or transitioning movement – and how some rhythms could enable an autistic person to move easier, while other rhythms might serve to trap a person in a sort of loop, and yet others might make it hard to move. She presented some research, which I wasn’t able to evaluate, so I’m not going to speak about the scientific basis of her theories – as I really don’t know one way or another about them.

What I will speak about is my personal experience, as an adult with autism. During her presentation, it “clicked” why I use my tablet-based AAC device so much less than my older keyboard-based devices. Certainly, being able to type at 100 WPM or faster makes me prefer keyboards, but there is more to that, and I think it’s applicable to other autistic people too. I set my tablet to provide a short vibration when I tap a key, but not to provide auditory feedback which I believed would disturb other people (probably true).

However, after listening to Suzanne’s presentation, I had an “Ah Ha!” moment. I learned to type on a real IBM keyboard – the kind you could hear three classrooms down the hall when the strong, real, “click” was heard.  Like this video:

This was when keyboards were keyboards.

I’ve never been able to type as fast on newer keyboards, but I never really thought much about why. But I think I know – for whatever reason, the clicks provide that feedback to get the next button pressed.

Sure enough, I tried it at Autcom – I turned on key clicks on my tablet, and sure enough I found not only could I type easier, but I could also think of my next word and thought easier. I could communicate better.

Is it placebo effect? Maybe. Is it something where the keypress rhythm is stimulating my mind in a better way? Maybe. I don’t know. All I know is that I was able to say what I was thinking again, using typing, in a way that I can’t as easily with speech. And I thought I had lost that when I converted to a tablet device. That’s pretty exciting. Being able to say what you think again is exciting! And I think Suzanne is onto something real.

It was also great to see some of my online Facebook friends and people whose writings I really admire.

So, overall it was a good time. Sure, there were moments that weren’t so good, but I won’t get into those right now. Right now, I’ll focus on how to build my creepy staring child simulator and how I might be able to actually use AAC again!